History Month celebrated at Sheep's Back Museum

LAST Friday was a special day at the Sheep's Back Museum with the launch of two new DVDs to close out History Month.

Sandy Schnickel watches himself on the new DVD at the Sheep's Back Museum which talks about how shearing was done back when he started.

Sandy Schnickel watches himself on the new DVD at the Sheep's Back Museum which talks about how shearing was done back when he started.

Guests of the National Trust visted the museum for the launch, including Naracoorte Lucindale mayor Erika Vickery, ABC radio presenter Stan Thomson and instigator of one of the DVDs, Gini Gale.

Naracoorte National Trust branch chairman Derek Blackwell oversaw the launch, giving a background on the DVDs - the first of which was a video walkthrough of the main museum, including the upstairs exhibit.

"It is our aim to make the museum as friendly as possible to all people," he explained.

"Gini Gale visited the museum with (curator) Judy Murdoch (to point out accessibility issues with the museum).

The trust applied to the council for a community chest grant of $2000, which was awarded and spent on commissioning design company HelloFriday to film the DVD - narrated by ABC radio's Mr Thomson, who congratulated the National Trust on the initiative.

Naracoorte National Trust branch chairman Derek Blackwell (left), Naracoorte Lucindale mayor Erika Vickery, ABC radio presenter/DVD narrator Stan Thomson and DVD instigator Gini Gale.

Naracoorte National Trust branch chairman Derek Blackwell (left), Naracoorte Lucindale mayor Erika Vickery, ABC radio presenter/DVD narrator Stan Thomson and DVD instigator Gini Gale.

Mr Blackwell thanked the council for its support.

"Thanks to the council for the grant," he said. "We've certainly done a lot with it."

Mayor Vickery responded on behalf of the council, speaking of how happy the council was to support projects such as this which enabled the museum to be accessible for everyone who used it.

The second DVD, which can be viewed in the old shearing shed, is an interview with long-time local Sandy Schinckel about his career in shearing and how it was done back in the "old days".

After the DVD showing Mr Schinckel then gave a short address to the crowd with more of his thoughts.

"It was good fun (shearing)," he said, before citing the numerous physical complaints he had.

"I just wasn't built to be a shearer."

He said shearing was a good career path, especially for the younger generation looking for some quick income.

"It's a good way for a youngster to get a few bob (award for a shearer was $267.47 per 100 sheep as of July 1, 2013)," Mr Schinckel said. "It's a good industry."

National Trust branch chairman Derek Blackwell with local artist Wendy Messenger, who designed the new "tickets" to the Sheep's Back Museum.

National Trust branch chairman Derek Blackwell with local artist Wendy Messenger, who designed the new "tickets" to the Sheep's Back Museum.

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