Wimmera farmers happy to get a hay cut from paddock of oats sown for sheep feed

BONUS: Cameron Penny, Warracknabeal, in a paddock of Wintaroo oats that was originally designated solely for grazing, but now slated for a hay cut.

BONUS: Cameron Penny, Warracknabeal, in a paddock of Wintaroo oats that was originally designated solely for grazing, but now slated for a hay cut.

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THE PENNY family, Warracknabeal, in Victoria’s northern Wimmera, are making an extra paddock of hay unexpectedly this season.

They have this in common with many farmers in NSW and Queensland who have been hit hard by frost and moisture stress, but the reasoning behind the decision it is much more positive.

Cameron Penny said the paddock, at Areegra, east of Warracknabeal, had always been slated to be sprayed out around this time of year to control problem weeds.

“We only bought the paddock in the last few years and we’ve been trying to keep the weeds in check via brown manure and hay crops,” he said. “This year, we scratched in some Wintaroo oats combined with a bit of vetch primarily to provide some sheep feed through the winter feed gap before we desiccated the crop and got on top of the weeds.”

However, there was a pleasant surprise for the family farming enterprise.

“Even with a good number of sheep on the paddock, around 800 ewes with lambs at foot in a 200 hectare paddock, they have not managed to keep the feed down.”

“There’s so much biomass here, especially on the hills where the sheep haven’t got to, we have decided to cut the paddock for hay.”

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He said hay was the best option for generating extra income, as opposed to leaving the oats for grain.

“The oats are a grazing/hay variety, not really suited to taking through to grain and weed management is the priority, which is why we’ve decided to make hay.

“It’s a good bonus, we expected it to be eaten down well and truly by now, but the oats have really got going.”

He said the crop was nearly exclusive oats now.

The paddock was sown early, in April, to get some feed going through winter, but good late winter rain has kept the crop flourishing.

The Penny family are experienced hay makers, having done so since the Millenium Drought, where they turned to hay to generate an income from failed grain crops. “We like the fact it gives you a little bit of flexibility, it allows you to control your weeds and it also is good risk management, you still have a crop even if the spring rains fail,” Mr Penny said.