Tasmanian bid to tackle one-punch attacks

Tasmania's campaign will be modeled on a national anti-violence initiative led by boxer Danny Green.
Tasmania's campaign will be modeled on a national anti-violence initiative led by boxer Danny Green.

An advertising and education campaign aimed at reducing one-punch attacks is expected to be rolled out in Tasmania later this year.

The state Liberal government on Friday announced $200,000 for the project, which will be modelled on a national anti-violence campaign led by boxer Danny Green.

"We're spreading a very strong message that we have no tolerance for this sort of thing in our community," Premier Will Hodgman told reporters.

Tasmania is in the process of tightening one-punch laws, described by the premier as lagging behind other states.

The move came after University of Tasmania academic Stewart Williams, 54, died in March from an alleged punch to the head outside a Hobart nightclub.

Beau Wayne Kelly, 18, is facing a manslaughter charge after initially being charged with assault.

Public consultation on the legislation is expected to open soon.

"There are, as it currently stands, loopholes in our legislation which can mean that an offender can claim what he or she did was an accident or a result of being intoxicated - they might be able to avoid criminal conviction," Mr Hodgman said.

"It's not something that often occurs but it's a loophole that's been addressed in other states".

Tasmanian Hospitality Association's Dominic Baker expects the campaign to begin around the festive season.

"This is about being on the front foot," he said.

Mr Green, a WBA light-heavyweight champion, described violence as a cultural issue but one on which the "momentum is shifting".

Australian Associated Press