Bringing more doctors to the Limestone Coast

NARACOORTE: Kincraig Medical Clinic practice manager Kate Foster, Member for Barker Tony Pasin and Kincraig Medical Clinic partner Jeff Taylor. Photo: Laura Sneath
NARACOORTE: Kincraig Medical Clinic practice manager Kate Foster, Member for Barker Tony Pasin and Kincraig Medical Clinic partner Jeff Taylor. Photo: Laura Sneath

More than half a billion dollars has been allocated to attract and train doctors to work in rural areas.

The Morrison Government announced $550 million under the Rural Junior Doctor Training Innovation Fund.

This will allow doctors to complete different stages of their medical training, from students to specialist, in rural communities.

Member for Barker Tony Pasin welcomed the Coalition Government's delivery in rural health and highlighted the practical benefits for the Limestone Coast.

"This latest funding will mean more doctors training in our region and will hopefully encourage interest in living and working here once they're qualified," Mr Pasin said.

"Today's announcement means a great deal for the region with eight places being delivered here through the Kincraig Medical Clinic in Naracoorte and Kingston Medical Clinic with the hospital base in Mount Gambier."

Round three of the programme was announced on Friday by regional services minister Mark Coulton and will deliver 84 training doctors into 22 rural communities across the country.

This third funding round also expands the Rural Junior Doctor Training Innovation Fund to include second year postgraduate doctors for the first time.

"The Training Fund will provide funding to increase the number of rural junior doctors training placements nationally. In 2020, the program will support up to 210 rotations for rural-based medical interns and up to 100 second year postgraduate doctors across Australia," Mr Coulton said.

Nine applicant organisations were successful through this third funding round delivering up to 100 new accredited rural primary care rotations available for rural-based second year postgraduate doctors across Australia, at a total cost of $3.2 million.

A total of $20.6 million was made available through the first two funding rounds.

"The Fund will assist to retain medical graduates and junior doctors in rural medical practice. Increasing rural medical training capacity is an important part of the Federal Government's commitment to developing a rural pathway for medical training."