Adelaide artist Wayan Dudug carving up a masterpiece in Naracoorte

Carving: Adelaide artist Wayan Dudug has been working on a sculpture project in conjunction with council based in Naracoorte's memorial parklands which depicts the Naracoorte Caves' famous fossils.
Carving: Adelaide artist Wayan Dudug has been working on a sculpture project in conjunction with council based in Naracoorte's memorial parklands which depicts the Naracoorte Caves' famous fossils.

Adelaide artist Wayan Dudug has been carving up a masterpiece at Naracoorte's Memorial Parklands.

Mr Dudug has been working on an exciting community art project involving a sculpture depicting the Naracoorte Caves famous fossils in conjunction with Naracoorte Lucindale Council.

He has completed the sculpture after hand carving fossils in the the 3.5 tonne limestone rock, delivered from Naracoorte's Red Hill Quarry, with the artwork being located at the beginning of the Caves Trail.

Mr Dudug is originally from Bali, moving to Adelaide in 1993 where he has created a number of artworks through a variety of mediums over the years - he spoke with the Herald about what these mediums have entailed and how he has transitioned to different types of materials over the years.

"I do some painting and sculpting - from the beginning I carved artwork out of wood and then I used hebel block and then I used Mount Gambier sandstone and finally Naracoorte limestone - it is very good to carve, it is good quality."

After working at Naracoorte High School for a short time last year, Mr Dudug was able to undergo research on what he needed to depict through this most recent project, researching the range of fossils on display during his visit to the caves.

While working at the school, he developed a project for the Sheep's Back Museum, designing and carving three different artworks out of limestone which he displayed to council after completion.

"I invited council to come have a look and then they liked it," Mr Dudug said. "They said that they wanted one in Memorial Park.

"I am hoping in future that they will have one like this even bigger at Naracoorte Caves ... It would be good to have one here at the start of the track and then one at the cave."

Mr Dudug began the project on September 21, with council visiting the final product today.

The artist mentioned the work that he does at different schools in Adelaide, as he is hoping to work regionally in the future again.

"I work at lots of schools, I am working at Westminster as an art teacher at the moment," Mr Dudug finished. "I am hoping in future I can get more projects and work with the school again, that would be great, I love showing them how to do carvings."